Community

Tamarindo-Langosta Street Would Be Paved

Written by Marisol
WAYRA Instituto de Español

• Work would start in November and would cost about ¢ 350 million.

• Municipality of Santa Cruz will provide ¢ 50 million and MOPT, the rest.

The dream of many residents, visitors, and business people have of having an accessible street, dust-free in summer and hole-free in winter, could be a reality as the Municipality of Santa Cruz has agreed to contribute with ¢ 50 million for the construction of this road.

This was confirmed to Tamarindo News by Imara Rodriguez, municipal councilor, who explained that the Ministry of Public Works and Transport (MOPT) committed to do the work.

“What was said was that MOPT will take charge of the asphalt work where there is sub ​​base and this is from Tamarindo to the hotel Capitán Suizo,” said Rodriguez. “I was representing the Council, with the mayor (of the Municipality of Santa Cruz), at the meeting of August 16 at Cala Luna Hotel, attended by the engineer Julio Viales, regional director of MOPT, Deputy Juan Marín, and other business owners in the area,” he added.

The road would cost about ¢ 300 million. According to Jorge Chavarria, mayor of Santa Cruz, MOPT will cover it. “The work would begin in November,” Chavarria said.

According to Imara Rodriguez, the Municipality would contribute with a 10% of the total cost (¢ 30 million) and with materials such as sand and stone, so totaling ¢ 50 million.

We tried to confirm this information with MOPT engineer Julio Viales, but we were unable to contact him; therefore, in future editions, we will be following up on this subject of so much interest to the community.

Tamarindo News has been informing you about this in previous editions. Several missteps, including the lack of funds, have made this project come postponed year after year, without completing the infrastructure the community expects.

Last year, a technical dispute between MOPT and Santa Cruz Municipality on the size and thickness of the road delayed the project. This forced the Municipality to re-bid the work that had already been awarded to pave only 220 meters at the entrance to Langosta.

This is an issue that has waited years to be solved. Since 2007, residents and investors in the area have fought for the Municipality to finally return them the taxes raised in a work that will increase economic activity and hence the tax contribution that they could raise further to improve the quality of life of its inhabitants.

Poor Investment in Tamarindo District

Today, according to the Finance Department of the Municipality of Santa Cruz, Tamarindo is the district that generates more resources to the canton and receives very little return for this contribution in works and services, since the local government invests only three percent of more than the 30% collected.

Also, 40% of what the law requires municipalities to collect due to maritime-land zoning canon must be invested in improvement works in the tourist areas, but this reality is not evident in Tamarindo, Langosta or other coastal areas of the canton.

Act on Maritime-Land Zone

“Article 59. Income received by municipalities for concessions in the restricted area will be distributed as follows:

  1. Twenty percent will be set aside as a fund to pay for improvements, as provided in this Act;
  2. Forty percent will be invested in improvement works in relevant tourist areas, including those all necessary investment as to consultancy and administrative expenses required for the purposes of this Act.

When the funds indicated in the two preceding paragraphs were not, in whole or in part, necessary for the development of the tourist area, according to the National Institute of Housing and Urban Development and the Costa Rican Board of Tourism, the remainder may be used for other needs of the corresponding canton ; and

  1. The remaining forty percent will be invested in improvement works of the canton.

Law No. 6043 as of March 2, 1977, published in Scope No. 36 in Official Newspaper La Gaceta No. 52 of March 16, 1977.

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