Community

Tamarindo faces water issues once again

Written by Marisol
WAYRA Instituto de Español

By Ellen Zoe Golden Photo from: Municipalidad de Zarcero

For the last five years, Costa Rica in general, and Tamarindo specifically, have had a problem keeping the water flowing in homes and businesses. As a precaution, earlier this year, the two main water companies of the town, the ASADA and AyA, instituted water rationing between 7-8 hours at various times of the day depending on the area.

According to a variety of neighbors, the hardest hit part of Tamarindo is Langosta in the area from Capitan Suizo Hotel to the river mouth point and back. This is territory supplied water by Instituto Costarricense de Acueductos y Alcantarrillados (A y A).

 “The water was supposed to be off in Langosta for 7 hours a day, but last month, it was out for 3 days straight,” reported Eduardo Vargas, administrator of Asociacion de Desarollo Integral de Tamarindo (ADI). “Some residents of Langosta asked ADI to help with the situation. ADI composed a letter to the President of AYA (Yamileth Astorga Espeleta) asking for urgent help. Our goal is to work together with AyA to come up with a solution to this issue.”

ADI talked to the workers in Tamarindo, and they were told that new Los Jobos reservoir has water, but that there is not currently enough pipes to connect it to Langosta. And, there is no due date on the pipe being delivered and installed.

In the meantime, the ASADA has offered a short-term solution: they can make a temporary bridge to Los Jobos until the permanent pipes arrive at AyA. This proposal has not yet been accepted.

ASADA’s area tanks are also lower than normal, but there have been fewer reports of water issues in Tamarindo, Vargas said.

Carolyn Herman, owner of RPM Property Management, said that while their houses in both Tamarindo and Langosta were having problems with water since April, they were prepared this year having been through this situation before. “April was tough, with rationing and we had to order water trucks for clients, and Langosta was awful, but it’s better now that all the tourists are gone.”

“But,” she added, “that doesn’t make it any less annoying that the city can’t get the water all figured out. It’s easier for us too than individual homeowners because we can order a big truck of water and split it up. If you are just one house, you can’t do that and its crazy money.”

At Pasatiempo Hotel, manager Toni Onofri related that they have a water plant and have ASADA and limited problems. She was not so lucky at home in Langosta under the auspices of AyA, as she had a burst pipe in front of her house, leaking day and night. After many calls to AyA, who told her they only had three employees and that the pipes would break elsewhere soon, the water continued to leak. It took an in-person visit to the Santa Cruz office before anyone came to fix the pipe.

Tamarindo News will contact representatives of A and A to learn more about these events, in our next edition.

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