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Hotels Require Solutions to Water Shortage

Hotels Require Solutions to Water Shortage
Written by Marisol
WAYRA Instituto de Español

Economic losses, closures, and layoffs have been announced.

AyA values ​​new wells and project in Nimboyores.

A group of hoteliers of Tamarindo and Langosta spoke out about the lack of water and what they consider a poor service from the Costa Rican Institute of Aqueducts and Sewers (AyA), which has forced them to stock up by buying water from water tankers.

A dozen hotels in Tamarindo announced their need for an urgent solution to this problem that is already affecting their wallets. For example, Hotel Barceló announced that it had to spend $ 55,000 worth in water transportation in July only, to address the water demand of its guests. In case of continuing like this, the hotel has announced the dismissal of over 250 workers.

Due to the pressure from these businesses, who are seeking for solutions, Congressman Juan Marín, from National Liberation Party (PLN) and Mayor of Santa Cruz, Jorge Chavarria, settled, together with this sector, a commission to petition the government, especially AyA, to take urgent action in order to prevent the closure of hotels and the layoffs.

“The communities of the coastal area also suffer greatly due to the lack of drinking water”; “… The productive sector of the province requires clear, accurate and prompt responses to bring peace to their communities,” said Marín.

Meanwhile, AyA has announced that they will soon be drilling for water, so ensuring water supply to Langosta and Tamarindo, since, according to their data, the aqueduct serving these communities have suffered a reduction in water level of about 40 %.”

This version was confirmed by the mayor of Santa Cruz, Jorge Chavarria, who told Tamarindo News that there is a hydro-geologist doing assessments of wells to drill some of them deeper.

Marcial García, President of the Management Association of the Aqueduct of Tamarindo and Villarreal, said that the problem of lack of fluid affects AyA users. “This problem is not new. It has been unsolved for four years. In our case, we worked with responsibility, as mandated by law and honoring nature and our partners,” said García.

Asked whether this water-shortage situation could worsen under the pressure of the demand resulting from high occupancy (about 12 000 people are expected) in Tamarindo Beach Marathon, Garcia said: “I see no problem, because this event is mainly located in the city center of Tamarindo; therefore, it is ASADA’s area of ​​supply and I think we will draw the task.” García expressed his concern on the water supply being less than 25 %.

“We’re in red numbers, about to run out of fresh water and close to the imminent risk of saline intrusion. Currently, the disproportionate use of potable water for human consumption in other matters unrelated to its true nature is the root causing the real crisis,” he said.

AyA, the Asada of Lorena in Santa Cruz, members of Congress, and hotel owners will meet on September 8 in the community of Lorena to discuss a project that AyA has fostered. It consists in the exploitation of 188 l/s from Nimboyores Aquifer, in which there is, according to their projections, an availability of 60 l/s to provide potable water to the coastal area of Santa Cruz, from Potrero to Tamarindo, so contemplating about 16 communities with a population of about 21 162 people.

The situation has worsened due to the prolonged drought that has occurred in this rainy season and has even forced authorities to declare a yellow alert in the Northern Pacific. Losses in the agricultural sector have been recorded as of ¢ 10.5 million.

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